8August2018

United Stay Font

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

United Stay Font

United Stay Font

United Stay Font

United Stay Font

United Stay Font

TTF

8August2018

Under My Umbrella Font Family - 2 Fonts

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

Under My Umbrella Font Family - 2 Fonts

Under My Umbrella Font Family - 2 Fonts

Under My Umbrella Font Family - 2 Fonts

Under My Umbrella Font Family - 2 Fonts

Under My Umbrella Font Family - 2 Fonts

TTF

8August2018

Boeing 24 Font

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

Boeing 24 Font

Boeing 24 Font

Boeing 24 is a caps-only display font. Its letterforms are sans serif, and they look like they come from a monospaced font. However, Boeing 24’s monospaced-appearance is just a strong look ; in actuality, its letters have proportional widths. These appear quite industrial and constructed, too – almost as if they had been made by a machine, rather than by Deni Anggara, the Bandung/Indonesia-based type designer behind Boeing 24.

8August2018

Claire Font Family - 12 Fonts

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

Claire Font Family - 12 Fonts

Claire Font Family - 12 Fonts

 

Claire is a family of fonts with sturdy serifs. Several of the weights in the family are optimal for setting large amounts of running texts; the extreme light and heavy fonts, on the other hand, work great together in display applications. The letterforms in Clair have a vertical axis, and their design is reminiscent of contemporary newspaper fonts, as well as late-nineteenth century typefaces along the Century model. Claire includes 12 styles ranging in weight from Thin to Black. Each of those six weights has a companion italic font, too. Claire’s letterforms feature thick slab-like serifs that are bracketed onto their stems. Since the proportions of its uppercase letters are nineteenth-century, they optically feel like they are all almost the same width. The same is true for the numerals, which share the same height as the capitals. The numerals include nice, decorative features, such as flag-like strokes on the bottom of the ‘2’ and the top of the ‘7’. The ascenders of Claire’s lowercase letters rise slightly above the tops of the uppercase letters and numerals. Claire}s x-height is also rather tall. The lowercase ‘g’ in the upright fonts, which is double-storey, has a lovely ear that ascends above the x-height. In the italic fonts, both the ‘a’ and the ‘g’ are single-storey. The italic letterforms also feature especially-prominent ball terminals. Claire is the work of a team of Paris-based type designers including Jérémie Hornus, Gaetan Baehr, Jean-Baptiste Morizot, Alisa Nowak and Théo Guillard.

8August2018

Gambarino Font

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

Gambarino Font

Gambarino Font

Gambarino is a condensed, single-weight serif face for headlines. The font is designed by Théo Guillard. Stylistically, you could call it a post-modern interpretation of the Garalde genre.

8August2018

Cosmetic Font Family

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

Cosmetic Font Family

Cosmetic Font Family

 Cosmetic is a very high-contrast family of sans serif fonts. As its name implies, it has been developed for exquisite applications, like the corporate identity of fashion or beauty product firms, or for cosmetic product packaging design. For centuries, the fashion world has looked to France for inspiration. 

8August2018

RAY Font Family - 5 Fonts

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

RAY Font Family - 5 Fonts

RAY Font Family - 5 Fonts

Ray is a light-hearted family of display fonts. Its letterforms were inspired by the kind of typefaces used on digital displays. The family includes five variants, each of which shares the same character width, inter-character spacing, and OpenType features. They are each derived from a strict grid. Ray One’s letterforms make use of a series of dots overlayed on top of a background grid. The capital letters, lining figures, and lowercase ascenders are nine dots tall. The x-height is seven dots. The descenders have two dots worth of space available below the baseline. The Ray Two fonts uses squares instead of dots. These all run into each other, but still present a pixelated effect to the texts they set. Those squares are rounded off in Ray Three, making this style appear like a combination of the Ray One with the Ray Two font. Ray Four adds bridges between many of the gaps found between the grid units visible in Ray Three. These rounded elements from Ray Four are in turn re-squared in Ray Five, making that font look like a cross between Ray Two and Ray Four. The fonts in the Ray family include both lining and oldstyle figures, as well as several alternates for letters like the ‘Q’, ‘R’, ‘S’, and ‘g’. Ray come from Satya Rajpurohit, the Ahmedabad-based type designer who co-founded the Indian Type Foundry.

8August2018

Monorama Font Family - 4 Fonts

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

Monorama Font Family - 4 Fonts

Monorama Font Family - 4 Fonts

Monorama is a family of caps-only display fonts. Its letterforms are sans serif and quite industrial-looking. While text set in the four Monorama fonts appears at first glance to be monospaced, that is just a strong look ; in actuality, the letters have proportional widths. Monorama contains a number of constructed-design hallmarks. The fonts’ ‘M’ and ‘W’ share a nearly-identical form, rotated 180°. Letters that are traditionally rounded, like the ‘C’ or the ‘O’, are all straight-sided. In fact, the Monorama fonts do not include any curves in at all. Stroke-endings are mostly modulated, looking a bit like the ends of strokes in ‘rounded’ fonts (but also like ‘college’ or sports fonts). The ‘Q’ doesn’t descend below the baseline, but still has a tail. The ‘J’ has a non-descending tail of its own, too. The zero features a slash inside of its counter to distinguish it from the ‘O’. Monorama includes a full range of numerators and denominators for typesetting fractions, as well as ten directional arrow glyphs per font. Each font also has two different ampersands to choose from. Monorama is an excellent choice for headline-typesetting and logo design, but will certainly be used for concert and event flyers, too. It would even be great for branding a sports team. Monorama was developed by Deni Anggara, a type designer based in Bandung/Indonesia.

8August2018

Sharpie Font Family - 5 Fonts

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

Sharpie Font Family - 5 Fonts

 Sharpie Font Family - 5 Fonts 

Sharpie is an informal family of script fonts. It includes five different styles, ranging in weight from Light to Black. The typeface, named after a kind of marker, looks very sign-painterly – almost as if its letters had been written out quickly with a flat brush. All of its letterforms are slanted, and they do not connect with the characters that come before or after them. Sharpie’s strokes are very angular in their appearance. The stroke-contrast is rather modest in the Light weight, but by the Black, it is very strong (really quite awesomely so). Sharpie’s lowercase letters don’t have a very tall x-height. The tops of the ascending-lowercase letters, the capitals, and the numerals all rise to about the same point. The ‘a’ and the ‘g’ in Sharpie are both single-storey in their forms. The typeface is designed by Théo Guillard.

8August2018

Locomo Font Family - 7 Fonts

Written by uploader. Posted in Font

Locomo Font Family - 7 Fonts

Locomo Font Family - 7 Fonts

Locomo is a seven-weight family of constructed sans serif fonts. The sides of each letter in Locomo are flat. Many of the typeface’s characters have rounded tops and bottoms; however, in the case of letters where these are traditionally flat – like in ‘E’, ‘F’, ‘I’, ‘L’, and ‘T’ – Locomo keeps these flat, too. The family’s range of weights begins with Extralight and expands to Black. In all of the fonts, characters are drawn with monolinear strokes. In each of the weights, the fonts’ inter-character spacing is very tight. Locomo is a little wide, especially in the lowercase. The lowercase letters also have a tall x-height. For their design, simple forms have been favored. The ‘a’ and the ‘g’ are both single-storey, for instance. Jean-Baptiste Morizot designed Locomo for display applications; the larger the size, the better. This will give Locomo’s unique design language enough space to make the intended statement

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